SECOND QUARTER 2017 – RISK TOLERANCE

In the investment world, there are two aspects of risk tolerance: (1) an investor’s capacity for risk, or ability to absorb losses, and (2) how comfortable an investor is with risk.

An investor’s capacity for risk is looked at purely from a financial point of view. How much money can the investor afford to lose? An investor who depends on his or her investments to pay daily expenses, and for whom a loss would represent a serious problem, has less risk tolerance than someone for whom an investment loss might merely be an inconvenience or disappointment.

How comfortable an investor is with risk, from an emotional standpoint, depends on many factors, including his or her objectives & goals, life stage, personality, knowledge of investing, and investment experience. Some investors will hang on to an investment during downturns in the market, while others will bail out at the first sign of trouble. You should only invest as much as you are comfortable with. If you find yourself losing sleep worrying about your investments, you may have invested too much or too aggressively.

Investors typically fall into three categories of risk tolerance: aggressive (those who are risk tolerant), conservative (those who are risk averse), or moderate (those who are somewhere in between). How risk tolerant you are is important, because it is one of the basic factors in determining the best investment strategy for you. Your risk tolerance can affect both the types of investments you make and the way you choose to diversify your portfolio.

What is investment risk?

In the investment world, risk means uncertainty, and refers to the possibility that you will lose your investment or that an investment will yield less than its anticipated return. That uncertainty about the outcome of an investment means that investment risk also refers to the way the price of an investment fluctuates or changes in value from time to time–its price volatility. The more the fluctuation–in frequency and in amount–the higher the volatility. Generally, the higher the volatility, the greater the uncertainty about the outcome of your investment, and the greater the potential risk involved.

There are three factors that are key to understanding risk: (1) the risk-return tradeoff, (2) the investment planning time horizon, and (3) the different types of risks that exist. You should have a solid understanding of each of these issues to select investments that maximize potential returns within your acceptable risk levels. Here is a brief discussion of each.

As risk increases, the potential for return increases. This is known as the risk-return tradeoff. Historically, investments with greater risk have tended to provide higher returns, though past results are no guarantee of future returns. The more aggressive you are as an investor, the more risk you take, and the greater chance you may have to earn a potentially higher return (assuming any return is earned at all).

Conversely, the more conservative you are as an investor, the less

risk you take, and the less potential you have to earn a high return (though you’re also less likely to lose your investment).

The length of time you plan to stay invested is referred to as your investment planning time horizon. Generally speaking, the longer your time horizon, the more you may be able to afford to invest more aggressively, in higher-risk investments. This is because the longer you can remain invested, the more time you’ll have to ride out fluctuations in the hope of getting a greater reward in the future.

Finally, many types of risk can affect an investment. Each investment is subject to all of the general risks associated with that type of investment. Risk also arises from factors and circumstances specific to a particular company, industry, or class of investments.

Note: All investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal, and there is no assurance that any investment strategy will be successful.

An investor’s risk tolerance may not be static (although authorities argue about this). Personal and outside factors may influence your risk tolerance at any given time or over a period of time. Thus, you might expect changes in your feelings about risk when there are increases or decreases in your family obligations, major shifts in the economy, or other such circumstances. It is wise to be prepared to modify your investment plan should such changes occur.

How is risk tolerance measured?

There are tests that measure risk tolerance to assess how an investor reacts to different types of risk. These tests are designed to give you a general sense of how much investment risk you can accept, and the results are generally considered reliable. Generally, risk tolerance tests fall into two categories: investment preference & psychological.

Investment preference tests

Typically, an investment preference test is a questionnaire that addresses preferences for selected investment vehicles. It asks questions about your current financial situation, goals, and past investment experience. This type of test is easy to construct and relatively simple. The disadvantage, though, is that it does not accurately gauge risk-taking propensity because it does not deal with emotional reactions to risk.

Psychological tests

A psychological test is a more elaborate questionnaire that attempts to gauge an investor’s attitude toward risk. This type of test generally includes questions about your feelings or behavior, or it may ask you to respond to hypothetical situations. This method of testing is easy to administer and can be fun to take. The disadvantage is that people often like to consider themselves risk-takers and may not respond as accurately as they should, only to find out during their first market downturn that they are more risk-averse than they had thought.

Download here a sample, condensed version, risk tolerance questionnaire. If you would like to re-evaluate your risk tolerance, or if you are new to investing and would like a first-time analysis, feel free to fill it out and mail it in to our office. Your financial advisor will look it over and give you a call to discuss your answers, and results, in greater detail.

 

 

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES
Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, or legal advice. The information presented here is not specific to any individual’s personal circumstances. To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, it is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.
These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.
Securities and investment advice offered through Investment Planners, Inc. (Member FINRA/SIPC) and IPI Wealth Management, Inc., 226 W. Eldorado Street, Decatur, IL 62522. 217-425-6340.

First Quarter 2017 – Taking Income from Your Portfolio

I think one of the most frequently asked questions I get from new (and existing) retired clients is “how much money can I take out of my account without depleting my principle?” Not only is this question frequently asked, the answer to it is often debated.

There are a multitude of factors that go into determining one’s withdrawal rate. As we have stated many times, every investor is unique. With that in mind, one could understand how the appropriate withdrawal percentage would differ between individual investors who have individual and unique goals, means, and circumstances. Although there is no set ‘rule of thumb’ there are some factors that come into play such as, the amount of money saved, age at the time of retirement, other sources of income, like a pension or Social Security, and annual living expenses. In addition, when determining your withdrawal rate, your asset allocation, projected inflation rate, expected rate of return, investment time horizon, and comfort with uncertainty (risk tolerance) will need to be considered.

So, what rate should you expect to get? Short answer, it’s complicated. The long answer, the seminal study on withdrawal rates for tax-deferred retirement accounts (William P. Bengen, “Determining Withdrawal Rates Using Historical Data,” Journal of Financial Planning, October 1994) looked at the annual performance of hypothetical portfolios that are continually rebalanced to achieve a 50-50 mix of large-cap (S&P 500 Index) common stocks and intermediate-term Treasury notes. The study considered the potential impact of major financial events such as the early Depression years, the stock decline of 1937-1941, and the 1973-1974 recession. It found that a withdrawal rate of slightly more than 4% would have provided inflation-adjusted income for at least 30 years. So, I typically use 4% as a nice starting point. Essentially, the younger you start tapping your retirement savings, the lower the annual withdrawal percentage must be for savings to last.

As an example: if you will retire at age 60, it’s probably smart to dial back your withdrawal rate to 2 or 3%. Retiring at age 70, by contrast, may let you pull out 6 or 7% of your money each year.

When setting an initial withdrawal rate, it’s important to take a portfolio’s ups and downs into account. According to several studies done in the late 1990s and updated in 2011 by Philip L. Cooley, Carl M. Hubbard, and Daniel T. Walz, the more dramatic a portfolio’s fluctuations, the greater the odds that the portfolio might not last as long as needed. If it becomes necessary during market downturns to sell some securities in order to continue to meet a fixed withdrawal rate, selling at an inopportune time could affect a portfolio’s ability to generate future income. A more aggressive portfolio may produce higher returns but might also be subject to a higher degree of loss. A more conservative portfolio might produce steadier returns at a lower rate, but could lose purchasing power to inflation, which leads me into my next point of why inflation is a major consideration.

To better understand why suggested initial withdrawal rates aren’t higher, it’s essential to think about how inflation can affect your retirement income. Here’s a hypothetical illustration; to keep it simple, it does not account for the impact of any taxes. If a $1 million portfolio is invested in an account that yields 5%, it provides $50,000 of annual income. But if annual inflation pushes prices up by 3%, more income, $51,500, would be needed next year to preserve purchasing power. Since the account provides only $50,000 income, an additional $1,500 must be withdrawn from the principal to meet expenses. That principal reduction, in turn, reduces the portfolio’s ability to produce income the following year.

In summary, your withdrawal rate can be the most important factor in minimizing the likelihood of outliving your money. As most of you know, if you take out too much too soon you might run out of money in your later years. On the contrary, if you take out too little you might not enjoy your retirement years as much as you could. As we all know, retirement isn’t merely about preserving a nest egg but using hard-earned savings to live life to the fullest.

If you have any questions regarding your current, or future, withdrawal rate, please give us a call. We will be happy to review your unique situation.

Your 1099 and Tax Filing

With the start of a new year, many of us are anxious to get rid of anything having to do with the year past. Filing our taxes as soon as possible usually rates at the top of the todo list. I would like to offer some New Year advice, to anyone that has a brokerage account or mutual funds that are not part of an IRA, and recommend moving them from the top of the list to the bottom (or at least the middle). Doing so may help you avoid the hassle and headache of having to file an amended return.

Certain investment types, such as non-traded Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), mutual funds invested in REITs, tax exempt municipal bonds, or dividend paying stocks are likely to experience income reclassification and other adjustments made by the issuers after the original tax statements are mailed. Income reclassification means that some or all of the income that was distributed to investors during the year has changed tax character or tax treatment. This typically involves changing a dividend from qualified to non-qualified, or vice versa. In some cases, a company may have paid out more in distributions than it earned during the year resulting in a reclassification that causes a taxable dividend to become a non-taxable return of principle. These are just a few of the things that take place behind the scenes and depending on when the companies report, corrected 1099s can be issued as late as April 7th.

I have attached a chart that shows the expected tax form mailing dates. If you have an account that may result in a Revised 1099, you should have a footnote that reads something similar to: THIS MAY NOT BE YOUR FINAL TAX INFORMATION SUMMARY. Please heed the warning and wait for your final summary before filing your taxes.

As always, please call your financial advisor with any questions or concerns.

 

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Third Quarter 2016 – Forms, Forms, and More Forms

You may have heard of the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA), a United States federal law enacted in 1980 (amended in 1995) designed to reduce the total amount of paperwork burden the federal government imposes on private businesses and citizens. Unfortunately, as many of you may have experienced in recent months, this does not pertain to the financial services industry.

With recent, and upcoming, regulations and rulings being handed down by the Department of Labor and other various governing bodies, the financial services industry is many trees away from ‘reduced paperwork’. In fact, now more than ever, additional forms and disclosures are being added to the pile of documents needed and necessary to open new accounts, maintain and update existing accounts, and disclose available options for IRA rollovers.

If you have ever watched the original Star Trek television series, you may feel like you are in the episode “Trouble With Tribbles” (substitute paper), I know I certainly do at times because my desk and all surrounding areas are covered with forms. So when you feel like you have signed enough forms to buy a house, when all you really wanted to do was invest your money, know that you are not in it alone. Just yesterday, I received my monthly statement and, as I pulled it out of the envelope, yet another disclosure (Mutual Fund Share Class Disclosure) fell to the floor.

While it may seem that all of these forms are ‘over kill’ and ‘unnecessary’, in the end, they are there to protect you, the investor, q3-2016-startrekas well as us, the consultant. So even though all of the additional forms were not of our making, we, at The Volkers Group, feel it is important to accurately and completely disclose information to our clients in order for them to make the best possible choice for their particular situation. The more complete and accurate the information is, the easier it is for you, the client, to be able to make informed decisions regarding your financial future. Simply stated by Francis Bacon, “Knowledge is Power”.

For those of you who have already experienced being “re-papered”, thank you for your understanding and patience. For those of you yet to join in on the fun, enjoy the beautiful fall season while you wait your turn.

 

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Second Quarter 2016 – Retirement Plan Considerations at Different Stages of Life

Throughout your career, retirement planning will likely be one of the most important components of your overall financial plan. Whether you have just graduated and taken your first job, are enjoying your peak earning years, or are preparing to retire, your retirement plan can play a key role in your financial strategies.

Years ago, one typically worked most of their life for a single, large employer who would then reward them with a pension, at retirement, for their years of hard work and loyalty. “Retirement planning” meant figuring out how to use your free time. Today, in all likelihood you will not be receiving a pension and instead will be living in retirement on money you, yourself, saved. So how should you view and manage your retirement savings plan through various life stages? The following are some points to consider.

Just starting out –

If you are a young adult, just starting your first job, chances are you face a number of different challenges. College loans, rent, & car payments all may be competing for your hard-earned, yet still entry -level paycheck. How can you even consider setting aside money for retirement? After all, retirement is decades away–you have plenty of time, right?

Before you answer, consider this: The decades ahead of you can be your greatest advantage. Through the power of compounding, you can put time to work for you. Compounding happens when your contribution dollars earn returns that are then reinvested back into your account, potentially earning returns themselves.

Example(s): Say at age 20, you begin investing $3,000/year for retirement. At age 65, you would have invested $135,000. If you assume a 6% average annual return, you would have accumulated a total of $638,231 by age 65. However, if you wait until age 45 to begin investing that $3,000 annually & earn the same 6% return, by age 65 you would have invested $60,000 & accumulated a total $110,357. Even though you would have invested $75,000 more by starting earlier, you would have accumulated more than half a million dollars more overall.(1)

That’s the power you have as a young investor – the power of compounding & time. Even if you can’t afford to contribute $3,000/ year ($250/month) to your retirement, remember that even small amounts can add up through compounding. So contribute whatever you can, & then try to increase your contribution amount as debts are reduced or paid off. In addition, time offers an additional benefit to young adults–the potential to withstand stronger short-term losses in order to pursue higher long-term gains. That means you may be able to invest more aggressively than your older colleagues, placing a larger portion of your portfolio in stocks to strive for higher long-term returns.(2)

Reaching your peak earning years –

The latter stage of your career can bring a wide variety of challenges & opportunities. Older children typically come with bigger expenses. College bills may be making their way to your mailbox or inbox. You may find yourself having to take time off unexpectedly to care for aging parents, a spouse, or even yourself. As your body begins to exhibit the effects of a life well lived, health-care expenses begin to eat up a larger portion of your budget. And those pesky home & car repairs never seem to go away.

On the other hand, with 20+ years of work experience behind you, you could be reaping the benefits of the highest salary you’ve ever earned. With more income at your disposal, now may be an ideal time to kick your retirement savings plan into high gear. If you’re age 50 or older, you may be able to take advantage of catch-up contributions, which allow you to contribute up to $6,500 in your IRA or $24,000 to your employer-sponsored plan in 2016, versus a maximum of $5,500 and $18,000 respectively, for most everyone else. (Some plans impose different limits.)

Preparing to retire –

With just a few short years until you celebrate the major step into retirement, it’s time to begin thinking about when & how you will begin drawing down your retirement plan assets. You might also want to adjust your investment allocations with an eye towards asset protection (although it’s still important to pursue a bit of growth to keep up with the rising cost of living).(3) A financial professional can become a very important ally in helping to address the various decisions you will face at this important juncture.

Other considerations –

Throughout your career, you may face other important decisions involving your retirement savings plan. For example, you may want to review the differences between Roth contributions and traditional pretax contributions to determine the best strategy for your situation. While pretax contributions offer an upfront tax benefit, you’ll have to pay taxes on distributions when you receive them. On the other hand, Roth contributions do not provide an upfront tax benefit, but qualified withdrawals will be tax free.(4) Whether you choose to contribute to a pretax account, a Roth account, or both will depend on a number of factors.

Finally, as you make decisions about your plan on the road to retirement, be sure to review it with your advisor, alongside your other savings and investment strategies. While it’s generally not advisable to make frequent changes in your retirement plan investment mix, you will want to review your plan’s portfolio at least once each year and as major events (e.g., marriage, divorce, birth of a child, job change) occur throughout your life.

(1)This hypothetical example of mathematical principles does not represent any specific investment & should not be considered financial advice. Investment returns will fluctuate & cannot be guaranteed. (2) All investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal, and there can be no assurance that any investment strategy will be successful. Investments offering a higher potential rate of return also involve a higher level of risk.(3) Asset allocation is a method used to help manage investment risk; it does not guarantee a profit or protect against a loss.(4) Qualified withdrawals from Roth accounts are those made after a five-year waiting period and you reach age 59½, die, or become disabled.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES

Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, or legal advice. The information presented here is not specific to any individual’s personal circumstances.

To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, it is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.

These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

 

 

 

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Fourth Quarter 2015 – PLANNING FOR LOSS OF LEGAL CAPACITY

Preparing for incapacity is never something we want to think about, and if we are not thinking about it, chances are we are not planning for it either.

Many people don’t plan for financial incapacity, because they think “It won’t happen to me” or they just do not want to face the fact that as we age, our health declines and situations change. Unfortunately, it just takes one sudden injury, or an onset of an illness, for a person to become incapacitated.

An incapacitated person is an adult who has been found to be incapable of receiving and evaluating information for themselves without the assistance of a guardian or caregiver. An incapacitated person may, for example, have a medical condition such as Alzheimer’s or dementia, which may limit their ability to make reasoned decisions, care for themselves, or handle their financial matters.

As we age, the likelihood of needing someone else who is capable of handling our affairs, whether they are financial or medical matters, becomes much more important, hence the old adage “It’s better to be safe than sorry.” Although most of us don’t plan on becoming an incapacitated person, if the time comes that you are unable to make decisions for yourself, regarding your finances and/or health care, being prepared gives you the power to not only name an agent to manage your affairs, but also to tailor the authority of the agent to meet your needs and wishes should the situation arise.

There are many things that go into planning for incapacity. To get started, ask yourself some basic questions, such as:

  • Who do I want as my advocate to make decisions when I am no longer able?
  • Who do I want to manage my financial affairs if I become incapacitated?
  • Are there any specific powers that I would or would not want my agent to have?
  • When do I want my agent’s authority to begin?
  • Who do I want to make my health care decisions if I cannot?
  • What type of care do I want?
  • How comfortable do I want to be?
  • Are there circumstances where I would not wish to be kept alive?
  • Have I clearly communicated my wishes with my family?

Once you have answered these questions, you have the foundation for a plan. You will then want to make an appointment with your financial advisor who will work with you to outline your current financial situation, review your goals and help you develop a plan to achieve them. In the event you become an incapacitated person, having an updated financial roadmap will give whoever is in charge of managing your finances a better idea of how to manage them correctly according to your wishes.

In addition, you will want to see an attorney to help you decide what tools you need to implement your plan. For example, what type of power of attorney would work best for your situation? Should you have a living will, an advance directive regarding health care and end-of-life decisions, or a combination of both? Once you have prepared your documents, you should review them periodically to make sure they are up to date, and keep clean, legible copies in a safe place and make sure that your family knows where to find them. You may even want to provide a copy to your agent and/or other family members.

Whatever the cause may be, incapacity can be tremendously stressful to everyone involved. Simple planning can help reduce this stress by allowing for the seamless management of finances and providing guidance on health care decisions. Coming up with a plan now is a great step in the right direction.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES

Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. does not provide investment, tax, or legal advice. The information presented here is not specific to any individual’s personal circumstances.

To the extent that this material concerns tax matters, it is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law. Each taxpayer should seek independent advice from a tax professional based on his or her individual circumstances.

These materials are provided for general information and educational purposes based upon publicly available information from sources believed to be reliable—we cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of these materials. The information in these materials may change at any time and without notice.

Securities and investment advice offered through Investment Planners, Inc. (Member FINRA/SIPC) and IPI Wealth Management, Inc. 226 W. Eldorado St., Decatur, IL 62522. 217-425-6340.

 

 

 

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2015 Designated Charity – The Shoe Bus

Every year we select a local charity to support as part of our client appreciation event.  This year, instead of donating money to a worthy cause, we donated socks and shoes… a lot of socks and shoes!

ShoeBuspromoThe Terre Haute Women’s Club heads up a “Shoe Bus” project that provides shoes to Vigo County school children in need. The shoes and socks are distributed through the use of a modified van that makes weekly “shoe bus runs” to Vigo County schools.  Children are recommended by local school nurses for new shoes. Students receiving shoes also receive two pairs of new socks.

The Volkers Group is proud to support creative and worthy causes like this in our community.

More information about The Shoe Bus and the Terre Haute Women’s Club can be found online at http://www.terrehautewomensclub.com/.

 

 

Investment Planners, Inc. and/or IPI Wealth Management, Inc. do not endorse and are not affiliated with this charitable organization.

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Understanding the 60-Day IRA Rollover Rule

Retirement plans are a beneficial way to save money for your future because they allow you to make pre-tax contributions and they provide tax deferred growth on your investments. There are many different types of retirement plans including employer sponsored plans, such as the 401k, 403b, and Simple IRA as well as the very popular, selfdirected Individual Retirement Account (IRA), the Roth IRA, and the SEP IRA. Because these accounts are intended to be used for retirement, there are several IRS rules and regulations which need to be followed in order to reap the benefits and avoid the penalties. In addition, the rules can vary from one type of IRA plan to another. For this article, I am going to focus on the 60-day Rollover Rule (Internal Revenue Code Section 408(d) (3)).

Retirement accounts are required to be held at financial institutions. These institutions are referred to as custodians. The custodian handles the reporting of retirement plan activity, such as contributions and distributions, to the IRS. They also take custody of the assets, process all transactions, maintain records, file required IRS reports, and issues client statements. Great care must be taken if you decide you want to change from one custodian to another. The manner in which this change is made is important to the IRA owner. Penalties and taxes can apply if not handled correctly.

So, what is the 60-day Rollover Rule? In the past, this rule allowed individuals who were changing custodians, to receive a check from their qualified account/IRA made out to them personally. They would then have 60 calendar days from the receipt date to redeposit those funds into another qualified account/IRA, or even back to the same one. It was intended to help individuals who wanted to change the custodian of their retirement account by using the indirect transfer to avoid paying taxes. However, as time passed, a loophole was found and it became a way for investors to take short term ‘loans’ from their IRAs without having to pay taxes or penalties, as long as the money is put back in within the 60-day ‘rollover’ period. If distributed assets are not contributed back within the allotted time, the distribution will be considered a withdrawal and become a taxable event. In addition, if you are under 59 ½ you will also be hit with the 10% early withdrawal penalty.

Because one 60-day rollover was allowed per qualified account, per year, people began setting up multiple IRA accounts, which gave them the ability to take numerous ‘short term loans’ per year. About a year ago there was a court case regarding a tax lawyer who had multiple IRAs. He took a 60-day rollover out of one of his IRAs, then he did a second rollover out of another one of his IRAs to pay back the first distribution, then his wife did a rollover from her IRA and he used that money to pay back his second distribution. The multiple rollovers allowed him to have the money for about 6 months. This type of scenario was by no means what the IRS had intended for the rule. In the end, the tax court ruled in favor of the IRS, basically saying enough is enough and the law was changed. Now, as of January 1, 2015, owners of individual retirement accounts can only do one 60-day rollover from an IRA to another (or the same) IRA in any 12-month period, regardless of the number of IRAs you own. The limit will apply by aggregating all of an individual’s IRAs, including SEP and SIMPLE IRAs, as well as traditional and Roth IRAs, effectively treating them as one IRA for purposes of the limit. The one-year period is not a calendar year; it is a rolling 365 days or 12 months from the date of the rollover distribution. If a second 60-day rollover takes place within the one-year period, the distribution will be taxable and subject to a 10% early-withdrawal penalty if the client is under 59 ½. Should an individual attempt a second rollover, the problem cannot be fixed and the IRS does not have the authority to help correct the situation.

This new rule does not apply to direct rollovers or IRA transfers which are the simplest, most seamless way to change a custodian. An account owner will complete documents from a new custodian that authorizes the direct rollover or transfer from their IRA or employer sponsored plan. The new custodian then transmits this authorization for transfer to the former custodian. The transfer is typically completed in a few business days. In the event there are securities that cannot be transferred “in kind,” instructions to liquidate those positions will be included or they will not be transferred. The account owner does not take possession of any proceeds, and if a check is issued it is made payable to the custodian for the benefit of the individual so no reporting to the IRS is required.

If you currently have an old 401k or employer sponsored plan or any other IRA that you would like to consolidate into a self-directed IRA, please give our office a call, 812.232.5822, and we will be happy to help you through the process while avoiding taxes and penalties.

 

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Being Unique-Not Just a Title for Investors

If you have ever looked at our brochure, visited our web-site, and/or attended one of our seminars you have probably seen, or heard us speak about, our investment philosophy which includes the belief that “Every Investor is Unique”. What we haven’t printed until now, is that we believe The Volkers Group is unique as well.

We, at The Volkers Group, value the personal relationships we have with our clients. We know that there are many other financial firms out there to choose from, so as a team, we strive to provide our clients with top level service that we consider a “level above” or “more service than sales”. We want our clients to know that we put their interests before our own because they are our top priority and we want them to know they are being taken care of regardless of how the markets perform. In addition, we believe the way we work together as a team makes us shine, and our combined talents make us industry leaders.

By treating people as the unique individuals they are, we are able to help them find solutions for their life, not just their investments. We help people as they journey through life, and we do it with compassion; from beginning investors to those looking at their last years, we work
together with them to help meet their specific goals and desires.

As for the more detailed services we provide, one of our biggest assets is our customized financial planning worksheets combined with our personalized risk analysis. Financial planning can be a complex undertaking that, when done correctly, can provide a blueprint for working toward financial security. We, at The Volkers Group, know that our client’s lives and financial situations will change over time. That’s why we are committed to revisiting and refining each plan we design on an ongoing basis. In addition, we prefer to take a proactive approach to portfolio management. Because we are an independent firm, we do not have proprietary products that we are required to offer or sell. Instead, we are able to select from a wide array of investment vehicles which gives us the ability to provide custom allocation solutions for individual portfolios versus having to choose from pre-made specific models dictated by a third party.

Established in 1996, with over 100 years of combined investment experience and knowledge, the consultants and staff at The Volkers Group are dedicated to assessing the needs of our clients and helping them achieve their long term financial success by providing:

• “More Service than Sales”.

• A customized experience.

• Retirement planning

• A proactive approach to portfolio management.

• Up to date positioning for the current market conditions.

• Strategies for wealth preservation.

• Seminars and workshops

• Individual Portfolio Evaluation Reports

• 401(k) and 403(b) allocation assistance

• Monthly summaries and quarterly newsletters

• Website and online account access.

Wherever you are in life, The Volkers Group can help you with all of your investment needs.

There is no greater compliment than that of your referral!

 

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